Mapping

From the Linguistic Atlas of the Upper Midwest to the Dictionary of American Regional English, maps have long been cornerstones in the study of language. New mapping technologies present exciting opportunities for studying and representing language and diverse linguistic communities in fresh ways, which we are committed to exploring in our teaching, research, and public service. In our various projects and collaborations, we're developing ways to create and use paper and web-based maps that reveal and explain complex linguistic features, such as vowel shifts, and also portray the social, historical, and cultural contexts in which language exists.  Here are some samples of our work:

Placing Speech
This interactive prototype is being developed in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin Engage project for a computer simulation that introduces students to vowel acoustics and regional and social variation. 

Representing Vowel Shift
These paper maps show the use of univariant and multidimensional symbols to represent vowel differences in a linguistically significant area of the Upper Midwest.   

Change in Language Spoken at Home, Marathon and Portage Counties, Wisconsin
This paper map draws on US census data to show changes in the linguistic landscapes of two Wisconsin communities from 1990 to 2000.

Languages Spoken at Home in Wisconsin
Part of our Baldwin "Language Matters" project, this paper dot density map shows the distribution of selected languages spoken at home in Wisconsin according to the 2000 US Census and reflects the state's linguistic diversity.

Distribution of Selected Languages Spoken at Home in Southwestern and Northern Wisconsin, 2000
These maps show the distribution of German, Hmong, Native American, Scandinavian, and Spanish languages spoken at home at the county subdivision levle, using data from the 2000 US Census.

Distribution of Selected Languages Spoken at Home in Southeastern Wisconsin, 2000
Using data from the 2000 US Census, these maps show the distribution of German, Hmong, Native American, Scandinavian, and Spanish languages spoken at home in Wisconsin.

German Immigration to Wisconsin
Using historic census data from the University of Virginia's Historical Census Browser, this animated map shows patterns of German immigration to Wisconsin from 1870 to 1950. 

German-Language Use in Hustisford, Wisconsin
This paper map, based on a 1910 plat map from the Wisconsin Historical Society, plots historic census data collected by linguist Miranda Wilkerson about German-language use in Hustisford Township, Dodge County, Wisconsin.