Mr. Wagler's class joins students from Longfellow Middle School in La Crosse for "Being A Hmong Teenager" live panel broadcast On the scene of "Being A Hmong Teenager" live panel broadcast from Longfellow Middle School A student from Longfellow Middle School in La Crosse plays the qeej during a live panel broadcast: "Being A Hmong Teenager" Working with students from Longfellow Middle School in La Crosse Students from Longfellow Middle School in La Crosse speak out during "Being A Hmong Teenager" live panel broadcast Producing  "Being A Hmong Teenager" live panel broadcast from Longfellow Middle School Interviewing the panelists of the live broadcast by computer Students watching the live broadcast of "Being a Hmong Teenager"

Location | Themes | Reflections | How We Did It

"Being a Hmong Teenager"
Live Panel Broadcast

Introduction: Sara K. | Abigail

Birthplace and English Language: Erica | Sara K. | Abigail | Erica | Abigail | Erica

Studying Hmong Culture: Sara K. | Erica | Abigail

Introduction

On the last day of our trip we met up with some 7th graders from Longfellow Middle School [in Lacrosse, WI]. They study Hmong culture every year and we decided we wanted to know how they do it. The kids were interviewing six Hmong kids who used to be in that class. [Their names were Kazoua Moua, Se Ying, Vue Ying, Mia Cha, Bong Lo, and Vue Vang. -Abigail] When we walked in there were three people who were going to ask questions and one kid at the computer. The reason there was someone at the computer was because the interviewing was being broadcast live on the web. People could watch and send questions.
–Sara K.

Kids' Birthplace & the English Language


A couple of the students were born in Laos, some in Thailand and three in America.
–Erica

…One kid said he was born on the way to the refugee camps in Thailand.
–Sara K.

Some were born in the US, but for the rest it was extremely difficult to learn English and it could take up to two years to learn.
–Abigail

They said it was hard to learn English. Because, well, first of all they didn’t know the language and second of all they had to start in kindergarten math even if they were in grade school.
–Erica

When they were leaving Laos (the Hmong), many treasures and animals were left behind and many died escaping. They (and many others I am sure) would like to go back to Laos to see family members who had to be left behind, their livestock (if it is still alive), and their treasures.
–Abigail

These children call Laos “the old country.” Since they were born in Laos, wouldn’t that be called “their country” like a lot of older people call it? I think it has to do with the fact that the older people were actually brought up in Laos and can remember it well.
–Erica

Value of Studying Hmong Culture


…They asked … “Do you think schools in La Crosse should research more about Hmong culture?” …Most of the kids said about half their friends were Hmong and that there should be a class on Hmong.
–Sara K.

They believe that we should teach more about Hmong culture so people will understand more and not tease as much. “They don’t know even why we’re here!” said one student.
–Erica

They feel that the Hmong are treated differently mainly by somebody who doesn’t know their culture. They want the Hmong to be treated like everybody else, and they want classes about Hmong culture to teach more. …They feel that true friends don’t care about culture. They just want a nice friend!
–Abigail

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