Arts/Religion

Photo of the Gospelaires singing; one singer is clapping his hands

Interviewing the Gospelaires about gospel singing

Photo of two members of the Gospelaires

Interviewing the Gospelaires

The Gospelaires speaking about their music

The Gospelaires speaking about their music

 

Photo of the Gospelaires singing; one singer is clapping his hands

The Gospelaires speaking about their music

The Gospelaires speaking about their music

The Gospelaires speaking about their music

Photo of one member of the Gospelaires gospel group

Photo of the Gospelaires speaking about their music

 

Music by the Madison Gospelaires
Deforest, WI

Transcription of the Madison Gospelaires:

"Gospel music started in slavery times. You might say it was a form of communication. They would be working and they had something they wanted to say to somebody on the other end of the field and they'd start singing.

"You could also say that Gospel is something that comes to you, it comes from the heart; it inspires you to do things right . . . it makes things easier. Lot of people say Gospel comes from the blues but I don't agree; I think blues comes from Gospel. It's something that kind of frees the soul and spirit and expresses what you feel.

"We sing in the old-time way. When we started we tried to keep singing the old way, the way it was when we were growing up, because over the years you can see that it's changed a lot, and now you don't hear as much of the regular old-time Gospel.

"We sing wherever we're called. When I get up in the morning, I'm singing. It makes me feel very good inside. I sing Gospel when I'm working, makes my load a little easier.

"Have you ever heard the old saying, 'What your mind can conceive, you can?' It's just practice. If you want to do anything and you want it bad enough, if you work hard at it you can do it. I don't think it's a gift.

"You could take three or four of you guys together right now and you guys could start off singing a song you know, and it won't sound right. So you guys keep listening to each other and you got to go over it, over and over it, and listen to each other's voice. And then in your mind you'll start dropping a key lower or else going higher, just to make your voice blend in with the person next to you. That's what harmony comes from. . . . You just have to get used to hearing each other's voices to make things work out."

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This page last updated on October 2, 2002