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The speaker is a 68-year-old White woman with a college education from Carmi, Illinois; she was recorded in 1970.
4:25-6:05


County: White
State: IL

Commentary:
Carmi is a small town (population 5,400) in southeastern Illinois farming country, settled because of its location on the Little Wabash River, not far from the confluence of the Ohio and the Wabash. Its economy is agricultural, but it also has coal and oil. Its website states that "Carmi has always had a Midwestern mentality. Its people believed in hard work, family, religion and community." This is demonstrated by the speaker of the following excerpt.
Inf: I don't have a lot of free time. I start my maids to work at 8:30, and they stop for lunch at 11:30. And uh, I am here on the job, uh, start making calls at six o'clock in the morning, and I'm on duty until six of an evening. And then I am off for the evening. I have two girls that relieve me evenings, and then I can go and come as I like, do whatever I want to for the evening. Usually go out to dinner with my husband unless it's on Rotary. This evening there was a Rotary meeting, dinner meeting, I ate alone. And normally we go to the Oxford [?] and have dinner and get away from the motel and forget about it for a while. So I am pretty well tied down to my job.

FW: How long have you been working here?

Inf: Since 1949. [FW: Oh boy]. And I have a bookkeeper comes in, does my posting, couple of evenings a week. And I have a CPA man that does my tax work. And uh, I make all my own quarterly reports. It has to be very, very accurate and I have a very good bookkeeper to, that does the posting, but he's, I've never uh showed him how I make my reports an' I feel that I've been at it so long that I am very accurate with it. I, I would feel that I had to go over his, just to double check, until he got onto it, so I continue doing my own. And I make my payroll out. And supervise the maids. That's my day's work.

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