English Dialects | German Dialects | Links | Searchable Database | Home


The speaker is a 45-year-old White man with a college education from Jerome, Idaho; he was recorded in 1967.



County: Jerome
State: ID

Commentary:
Jerome lies near the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, in an area that was the center of a large Carey Act (also known as the Desert Land Act of 1894) project. This federal act allowed settlers, primarily farmers, to acquire land if they adhered to irrigation requirements designed to ensure successful cultivation. Agriculture remains the dominant local industry, and the city???s present-day population is 10,890. In this segment the speaker discusses dairy farming.
Inf: I was a relatively small dairy farmer, eh, in Jerome, Idaho, near Jerome, Idaho, for a number of years. Uh, I only had a small dairy operation. I milked approx-, approximately seventy head of cows. Uh???

FW: Seventy is small?

Inf: Seventy. Seventy is comparatively small to the modern operation that you have today. Some of the larger farmers are milking one hundred thirty to two hundred cows. One man is doing all the work with, uh, modern equipment. But they have???

FW: Now in Idaho, you know, seventy???s not a small, uh, seventy???s not a small herd. Thirty???s a small herd, I mean, in, uh, Wisconsin.

Inf: Yes.

FW: Uh, how about the, how about the equipment? Say you go out in the morning and get to the cows, then what do you do to ???em?

Inf: All right, uh, I had uh, a semi-modern dairy, dairy barn, uh, when I was milking cows. Uh, it cost, uh, approximately fifteen thousand dollars, including equipment. It was a cinder block, uh, constructed building. I had, uh, a bulk tank to store the milk after each milking. I used, uh, a surge milker. It was semi-modern compared to the standards of milkers today, uh, the milk was milked into a container beneath the cows, and I screened the milk into the bulk tank. They have milkers today that pipe the milk from the cow right into the bulk tank, for storage.

Back to US English Map
back to American Languages home