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The speaker is a 78-year-old White man with a grade school education from Winnemucca, Nevada; he was recorded in 1967.



County: Humboldt
State: NV

Commentary:
Winnemucca was named after the leader of the Kuyuidika band of the Paiute tribe in recognition of Chief Winnemucca???s help in guiding U.S. soldiers and travelers through the wilderness and deserts of the West. First settled in 1850 as a trading post for people going to and from the West Coast, the town became an important stop in the transportation of sheep, cattle, and ore. In the early twentieth century, Winnemucca remained something of a frontier settlement (as evidenced in this segment by the speaker???s story of a 1911 event). Today, the city has a population of about 7,400 and retains an economy based on cattle and sheep ranching and gold and silver mining.
Inf: This was on February the twenty-sixth, nineteen hundred and ???leven. And, uh, in the battle, uh, eight of the Indians were killed, and five of ???em captured. And, uh, that was the entire group, uh, the thirteen. And one of the state police, uh o-, o-, officers was killed by an Indian, uh, in that battle. Then, there was supposed to be a renegade, uh, White man in the group. And, uh, after the, uh, battle was all over and they had looked all through the camp, there was no sign of this White man.

So, the next morning, I happened to ride by there. I was running wild horses. And I saw this group of horses down on the flat, little ways, a mile below where I was riding, and I thought that was-, they were mustangs and I went down to look at ???em. And, uh, an Indian who was with the Nevada state police as a traitor, and one of the state policemen, eh, spotted me, and they thought I was the White man that was connected with the Indians, so they rode up and captured me and took me into camp. It was about an hour after they captured me before I convinced ???em that I was not connected with the Indians and they turned me loose.


The speaker is an 82-year-old White man with a grade school education from Winnemucca, Nevada; he was recorded in 1967.



County: Humboldt
State: NV

Commentary:
Winnemucca was named after the leader of the Kuyuidika band of the Paiute tribe in recognition of Chief Winnemucca???s help in guiding U.S. soldiers and travelers through the wilderness and deserts of the West. First settled in 1850 as a trading post for people going to and from the West Coast, the town became an important stop in the transportation of sheep, cattle, and ore. In the early twentieth century, Winnemucca remained something of a frontier settlement (as evidenced in this segment by the speaker???s recollection of the difficulties of delivering the U.S. mail). Today, the city has a population of about 7,400 and retains an economy based on cattle and sheep ranching and gold and silver mining.
Inf: During, uh, times of, of the e-, early days, uh, the contractor was responsible and he had to get the mail through, regardless if it took a hundred head of horses and all the men on the line to, to get the mail through, because there was an old fella back in Washington settin??? there with his feet up on the desk, spittin??? tobacco juice all down his front shirt. And he simply took it off of your check because you didn???t complete that mileage [Aux Inf: Oh] that day. He, he docked you for every, every day, or every part of the day that you didn???t get it.

You had, I had, we had t-, between Elko and Tuscarora, twelve hours in which time to complete that journey. One stage left each way in the morning at seven o???clock. It was arrive at Elko at seven. And in the morning it left Elko at seven and arrived at, but we wouldn???t get there, lots of times, for two and three days. And that chit [=record of money owed to the employer for supplies and expenses] was all deducted from our checks. We lost that day all entirely. You made your expenses, you had a hundred head of horses, and, uh, eight or ten or twelve or fifteen, twenty men. Get the mail through, and that???s the way they operated those days.

Now, today, the present contractors that submit a bid for contract, it???s uh-, as long as he wants it he has it [FW: Mm-hmm]. But we had it for only four years. And we had to outlay, we had to, uh, we had to buy all these horses and new equipment the whole time because they, eh, you didn???t want to buy the other fella???s equipment because he had, he had to, bou-, practically wore it out [FW: Mm-hmm]. So we always, we never bought nothing from the other fella. Because it was, uh, uh, you???d get new stuff cheaper than you could buy the old. And so we just [cough], we would just b-, buy all these new horses and break them, and order new harnesses. And then we had to, and then when the parcel post came in, that was a drawback to the contractor too, because there he had to, such quantities of mail to move that you had to go in the freighting business along with the staging, see? [FW: Mm-hmm.]

Aux Inf: And you didn???t get any?

Inf:: Hmm?

FW: Go ahead.

Aux Inf: And you didn???t get any more for it?

Inf:: And you didn???t get any more for it, because???

FW: Oh, it was in the original contract that you [Inf:: Yeah], I see.

Inf:: So it worked a hardship on us, us people that had the early-day contracts.

FW: You probably had to put more people on [Inf:: Oh, yes] to handle it and, uh???

Inf:: Yeah. The more equipment, no.

FW: Heavier equipment or just more of it?

Aux Inf: More, more.

Inf:: More.

FW: More.

Inf:: Yeah. Well, that we have-, we, the stage, uh had to have about six hundred pounds of mail, that was the-, that was the first-class mail, and then at the parcel post had a different rate, see? [FW: Mm-hmm.] But that had a, eh, he would-, he would bid on that too, for a half a cent a pound or a cent a pound.

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