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The speaker is a 52-year-old White woman with a college education from Moorhead, Minnesota; she was recorded in 1967.
6:30-7:55


County: Clay
State: MN

Commentary:
Moorhead, in far western Minnesota, is across the Red River and the state line from Fargo, North Dakota. It was settled in the 1870's, as a distribution and transfer point for goods and people; it had a wild reputation in the early days. Today education and services are also important, and the surrounding county is an agricultural area. The largest groups of settlers were Scandinavian and German. The speaker's grandparents came from Sweden; the influence can be seen in her use of the term julotta, an early-morning candle-lit Christmas church service.
FW: What uh, what other sorts of things did you do on Christmas?

Inf: Uh, well (cough) actually do you mean as far as gifts and things go? After we have our dinner and we must have the dishes washed up first, then we go to the Christmas tree that has been decorated, and the gifts are distributed. And after that we open our gifts and then uh years back we always went to julotta, which was five o'clock in the morning, but that has been changed so it's uh, more or less a midnight service now. So we go there and after that we go home and prepare for the next day, which of course is also very festive.

FW: Uh-huh. Did you uh, ever have any special customs going and visiting people on Christmas?

Inf: No, we never have because um, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day years ago were all spent at my grandmother's home but now it's spent at my, Christmas Eve we have at my niece's home because my apartment is too small, but we have Christmas Day in here, and pretty crowded but we always have Christmas Day here. There are about fourteen or fifteen of us that gather together. And Christmas Eve there are more because my niece's husband's people come, too, so there are about twenty-five there for dinner and for the evening.


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