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The speaker is a 67-year-old White woman with a grade school education from Jim Falls, Wisconsin; she was recorded in 1968.
10:45-13:30


County: Chippewa
State: WI

Commentary:
Jim Falls is a small industrial community on the Chippewa River north of Chippewa Falls, where shoe manufacturing, plastics, and small-motor production have supported the community's economy, as have surrounding dairy farms. In recent years, tourism has also become important. The speaker reminisces about her childhood in the nearby rural area.
Inf: Always having free shows up there. Well, not really free shows, but uh, oh, these medicine shows, you know, they used to have. And, so we took the lantern with us and we walked up there, and we left it on the neighbors' porch, we didn't want to take it all the way up with us. So, come during the show, why they showed the devil, his big, long horns, his pitchfork and everything. Scared us, of course, you know, an' we had to walk home in the dark, alone.

So we started home. We stopped to the neighbors and grabbed the lantern off the porch, and didn't stop to light it. And we beat it down the road. We wouldn't run 'cause we knew if we run, ever started running, we'd get so scared we'd keep right on running and couldn't run fast enough then. But we walked real fast. We sure was scared.

There, uh, to a program of some kind, a bunch of us. And, we walk and a big storm come up and just rained and thundered and lightning and we went into the barn up on the hill here. It uh, let up a little bit, and it was dark in there of course, an' my sister said to me, "Quit pulling on my dress," she said. I said, "I'm not pulling on your dress."

She felt behind her and here was a calf was sucking on her dress.

Eh, storm let up a little bit and we started on down the road. We walked home, got down there, one of the neighbors had stopped in, and because it was storming so hard, and they stayed all night, 'til four o'clock in the morning. It was one storm right after the other, just hard as it could storm, all night long.

And, uh, us kids used to have calves tied, (that's alright, you can-) we had calves tied on a rope, you know, out in the yard, quite a long rope on 'em so they could feed. And, the folks had told us not to turn 'em loose, you know, not to untie 'em because they'd get away from us. You know, it's pretty good-sized calves, so we thought it was fun to untie 'em and let 'em run, you know, and run behind 'em.

So, uh, my oldest sister, not my oldest one, but Grace, next to my oldest sister, she untied one of 'em , and us kids untie-, each untied one, we's running behind 'em and all of a sudden one got the best of her and started down the road. And her feet was just a-pounding, you know. And uh, head back, to keep from falling, and hanging on to the calf, she didn't dare let it go, because they told her not to let it loose. She met a neighbor man, "How do you do?" she says. [(?)] Finally she got the calf stopped and brought it back.


The speaker is a 42-year-old White woman with a high school education from Jim Falls, Wisconsin; she was recorded in 1968.
3:55-6:00


County: Chippewa
State: WI

Commentary:
Jim Falls is a small industrial community on the Chippewa River north of Chippewa Falls, where shoe manufacturing, plastics, and small-motor production have supported the community's economy, as have surrounding dairy farms. In recent years, tourism has also become important. The speaker describes the local economic scene.
Inf: Most of our local industry is um, uh farming. Uh we have uh, large dairy wh-, in Jim Falls, which the Kraft company has just added to, to uh, have a cheese-making plant. Prior to this they had uh, made uh, dried milk to ship to uh, the underprivileged in foreign countries. And, we have uh, two shoe factories in Chippewa who employ several people from around our area. They commute between Jim Falls and Chippewa. National Presto Industries, between Chippewa and Eau Claire, uh, employ many people from this area. In fact, they have uh employees from as far away as Ladysmith and uh, Rice Lake, uh, Durand, Alma Center, and they commute back and forth mainly. Um, there are a couple of small factories -- Johnson Manufacturing, that um, make motors for industry, and uh, Consolidated Thermo Plastics, which of course make all type of plastic bags, dishes, that type of thing. And um, they have an IBM or, uh, Data Control. They make the um machines and the boards and whatnot that they use in um, data processing work.

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