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The speaker is a 75-year-old White man with a high school education from Cheyenne Wells, Colorado; he was recorded in 1967.



County: Cheyenne
State: CO

Commentary:
Cheyenne Wells is a farm and ranching community in east central Colorado, 18 miles from the Kansas state line. It is the county seat of Cheyenne County, with a current population under 1,000. In years past the community celebrated the fall cattle roundup with a large gathering and dance. The men were given pints of whiskey, a band played, and dancing continued into the early morning hours. In this segment the speaker talks about a less festive event, rounding up cattle during a blizzard.
Inf: Well, the we, the one we h-, one w-, one awful blizzard we had was, I can???t remember the day, but it was, uh, we were eating breakfast and we had our cattle out in the corral and the shed was north the house. And I had went out be-, before breakfast and, uh, opened the gate so the cattle could go to the pasture [FW: Mm-hmm]. And they had to go about oh, maybe a hundred yards or so north, then they???d turn east and go down into pasture. So we, I had finished the chores, and then, uh, went out, uh, or was eating breakfast and I looked out of the window and I saw the cattle, uh, were starting out the gate and the wind was getting higher all the time [FW: Mm-hmm], so I went out and got ???em back in. By the time I got ???em back and shut the gate, you couldn???t see the house for the blizzard. Then we got ???em all into the shed and, uh, just run ???em in the shed and uh, I had, uh, a wagon lood-, loaded with cane, sitting right in front of an, the open door, empty shed, and I had, uh, three mules that went in that shed, and a horse or a mule will always stay on top of the snow, where a cow animal will just stand and get buried.

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