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The speaker is a 49-year-old Black woman with a high school education from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; she was recorded in 1968.



County: Philadelphia
State: PA

Commentary:
Settled in the late 1600s by William Penn, the city of Philadelphia quickly grew and became a hub for trade and commerce. It served as the nation???s temporary capital until it was moved to Washington, D.C., in 1800. The city is historically significant for many events, among them the Federal Convention in 1787, which produced the Constitution of the United States. In this segment the speaker talks about her past jobs.
FW: How long have you been uh, off work now?

Inf: Oh, two months. [FW: Really?] And I???m on pins and needles. Yeah, I went for an interview the other day at state employment and the man said he was impressed with my appear-, uh, appearance and experience. And then he called up the job and they told him I???ve been off sick, which uh, was true. And then he said he thought that I wasn???t ready. And he???s not a doctor nor a cardiologist, but uh, this is an opinion that he formed, you know, after talking. And uh, this was quite a letdown, because the job didn???t pay that much anyway, just a paltry eighty-three dollars a week, you know. But I figure I???d start off on something that was easy when I start back. So hopefully, I mean sitting around I???m not used to, and it???s good I???m not rich, and maybe if I was rich I???d have money to do things to occupy me, but just sitting around not feeling well, I mean, is a bore [FW: Yeah]! Because I-I worked two jobs for three years. I was a secretary in the day and a medical secretary at night. And um, this is just frustrating.

FW: Boy, I can imagine. I guess you had t-to just completely lay off work for a while, huh? An??? then???

Inf: Two months, yeah, and uh, I think I???m ready to go back in about a week or two. So I was looking around, you know, something that I don???t have-, that???s not too challenging and I don???t have to prove a point because I???ve been working all my life and I don???t want to prove anything except if I work I???ll eat. I mean this is [FW: Yeah], I???ve come to that, you know. And um, so hopefully. ???Course there???s so many jobs around now. Until it???s not too hard, I thought, if I???m incapable, then I might as well just forget it, you know. But my doctor says I???m ready to go to work.

FW: Does it take any uh, any special training to be a medical secretary, just, just, I guess, learning how to spell all those words?

Inf: Well, I had been a practical???yeah, yeah, this is uh, a thing in itself. I had been a practical nurse, uh, during the war; I took it up as a means to an end. And um, there are some difficult words. Each doctor seems like has his little idiosyncrasy, other than just medical terms, you know, just like when you mentioned ???proud flesh,??? you get a doctor in some section of the country that, that, uh that, that uh does use this [FW: Hmm]. But it???s not that common thing.


The speaker is a 22-year-old Black woman with a college education from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; she was recorded in 1970.





County: Philadelphia
State: PA

Commentary:
Settled in the late 1600s by William Penn, the city of Philadelphia quickly grew and became a hub for trade and commerce. It served as the nation???s temporary capital until it was moved to Washington, D.C., in 1800. The city is historically significant for many events, among them the Federal Convention in 1787, which produced the Constitution of the United States. In this segment the speaker is concerned with family matters and talks about getting ready for a new baby.
Inf: Um, yes. I think right now since we???re going to have a new baby, that???s been my main project for this month because uh, my daughter now has a double bed, and she had a canopy bed and all. So like we need to, in order to make enough room for a crib and all the accessories, we???re going to have to change everything around. So that???s why I plan to get bunk beds. And since I found a great bargain at the, pa-, uh my aunt???s old bed, my cousins and all are all through with them. We???re going to paint the bunk beds, I hope, hot pink [FW: Mm-hmm] and turquoise. And these are going to be the curtains for the bedroom [FW: Aww]. And I wanna pick up the colors in here so like one of the beds would be this shade of pink [FW: Mm-hmm] and the other one would be the turquoise. And the crib, I want a pale, I want this shade mixed to be a little bit paler than that. And it must be a boy. Now, it???ll just ruin everything if it???s not a boy. [Child in background: No baby!] And then the walls I plan to do in yellow. And so those basically would be the three colors I plan to use. And I think there may be a little, I don???t know, I think I???m thinking about making lavender throws for the uh, bed or pillows. Something like that.

FW: Are you making the, the draperies yourself?

Inf: Yes, uh they???re all finished now. Curtains are done. And let???s see, the painting, if my husband will stop procrastinating, will get done soon, I hope. And um, the rest of the furniture we???ll just do as we go along. [Child in background: I don???t want a baby!] And let???s see, what else is in there? There???s so many purchases that have yet to be made, which I haven???t quite accounted for where the funds are coming from.

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