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The speaker is a 64-year-old White woman with a college education from Honolulu, Hawaii; she was recorded in 1967.



County: Honolulu
State: HI

Commentary:
Honolulu is the capital of Hawaii and the state???s largest city, with a present-day population of almost 340,000. In the Hawaiian language, its name means ???sheltered bay.??? The Hawaiian Islands were initially settled by Polynesian migrants. In 1778, Captain James Cook was the first known European to visit the archipelago, and foreign ships made the islands an important stopping point in their travels between North America and Asia. Hawaii was annexed by the U.S. in 1898 and became the fiftieth state in 1959. Its tropical savanna climate, with distinct wet and dry seasons and fairly constant temperatures, is ideal for growing pineapple and sugar cane, the two main crops of the islands. In this segment the speaker talks about research that has been done to ensure the success of these crops.
Inf: Uh, the original work on, uh, the pineapple was done by the Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station, and then by a group of, um, pineapple growers, and finally a cooperati-, a cooperative was formed, and out of this cooperative, a part of the cooperative was to have a research institute. Uh, the research work, after it left the Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station, was partially done by the sugar experiment people, partly by the University. And the former president of the University also was director of the research institute as it then existed. And then, um, uh, he became the first director of the coordinated research institute, where-, where all the research work was done. Um, the research done was in the field of plant pathology. Um, nematology.

FW: What was that other-, that second one?

Inf: Nematology.

FW: Nematology [Inf: Yes]. The study of worm diseases.

Inf: Yes [FW: Yes]. Mm-hmm. Um, plant physiology, plant breeding, um, entomology [FW: Mm-hmm]. Uh, those were the main departments. And a general chemical laboratory where all analytical work was done. The, uh, because part of this work was first done at the University, the-, it was, um, the new buildings were put up adjacent to the University on their own private land.


The speaker is a 60-year-old Asian man with a grade school education from Honolulu, Hawaii; he was recorded in 1967.



County: Honolulu
State: HI

Commentary:
Honolulu is the capital of Hawaii and the state???s largest city, with a present-day population of almost 340,000. In the Hawaiian language, its name means ???sheltered bay.??? The Hawaiian Islands were initially settled by Polynesian migrants. In 1778, Captain James Cook was the first known European to visit the archipelago, and foreign ships made the islands an important stopping point in their travels between North America and Asia. Hawaii was annexed by the U.S. in 1898 and became the fiftieth state in 1959. In this segment the speaker, whose hobby is fishing, discusses types of fish and fishing techniques.
Inf: Mahimahi is a small fish. It, it???s have all those, uh, stripe on its back. And it???s not so good for eat, I guess.

FW: Mahimahi?

Inf: Uh-huh. Mahima??????

FW: M-, uh, maybe I???m-, maybe I???m saying it wrong, but I thought I saw it in the restaurants. It???s- [Inf: Mahuh-], I???m probably mispronouncing it.

Aux Inf #1: Mahimahi. That???s a fillet. You???re thinking about manini.

Aux Inf #2: Oh, yeah. Mahimahi. (It???s bigger.)

Aux Inf #1: It???s a sort of, um [Aux Inf #2: Flat fish, dolphin]. Yeah, dolphin.

FW: They, they, s-, they serve it in the restaurants.

Inf: Mahi??? [Laughter] [Aux Inf #2: White fish] The white, flat fish. Yeah, a white fish. Uh-huh. Basically, catch it at the corner side. Mm-hmm.

FW: Now which, what size is that?

Inf: That is, uh, go size about two feet to two and a half feet, I guess.

FW: And is-, you catch it then, in close to shore, or out in the water?

Inf: Oh, out in the water where the fish is. Ca???

FW: I see. Did you go fishing, do you go fishing in a sampan, or, uh, in some other kind of boat?

Inf: I used to go in a shore fishing.

FW: Oh, it was fishing from the shore [Inf: Uh-huh]. I see. Well then, you didn???t catch any mahimahi.

Inf: No, no, I didn???t catch any??? [Laughter]

FW: That???s a deepwater fish, isn???t it?

Inf: That???s right.

FW: Mm-hmm. What about some other fish around here? Uh, you mentioned another one earlier then, with a different name.

Inf: Oh, that, that, that???s called fishing ulua, but all this time I didn???t, I was going fishing, I didn???t catch any. [Laughter]

FW: You didn???t? [Laughter] Well, uh, how do you fish? W-, you use a pole, or something else?

Inf: Yeah, using a pole and a cast on it. And cast, in a ocean [FW: I see]. Yeah.

FW: And, uh, what kind of bait do you favor?

Inf: I used to use, uh, shrimp, and, once in a while I used to use those, uh, cuttlefish.

FW: What kind of fish?

Inf: Cuttlefish. [FW: Cattle fish?] Mm-hmm.

FW: I never heard of that. That???s a small fish, is it?

Inf: No, it???s like a, something like a, the squid [FW: Oh, I see], octopus, yeah.

FW: And then you cut pieces off.

Inf: You cut into pieces, yeah.

FW: Oh, I see. Yes, that???s like the fi-, the squid. Mm-hmm. And uh, now what kind of, even if you don???t always catch them, when you do catch them, what kinds do you catch?

Inf: [Laughter] Uh, mostly I usually catch eel [FW: Eel]. [Laughter] They used to call that puhi. You know, Hawaiian words they used, uh, puhi.

FW: Puhi [Inf: Uh-huh]. No, I don???t know about that.

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