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The speaker is a 20-year-old Black woman with a high school education from Chester, Pennsylvania; she was recorded in 1968.





County: Delaware
State: PA

Commentary:
Situated on the Delaware River at the New Jersey border, fifteen miles southwest of Philadelphia, Chester has a current population of around 34,000. Originally called Finlandia, then Upland, the city was settled by Swedish immigrants in 1644. In addition to being one of the oldest cities in the state, Chester was an early hub of commerce and trading and briefly served as the seat of government of the Pennsylvania Colony. In this segment the speaker talks about using hypnosis in the courtroom.
Inf: Oh, was it Archie, he was telling me about???he???s studying to be a lawyer, and uh he was telling me about this case that he read about where there was uh, he said if, if you were a hypnotist, you can hypnotize a jury into changing the verdict or something or other, like that.

FW: Really?

Inf: Yeah, and he said that it, there was this one guy, this lawyer who hired this, uh, professional hypnotist, and uh, he hypnotized a judge, and the judge changed his verdict. And someone there recognized uh, this guy to be a professional hypnotist, and they brought in eh, well e-, eventually he confessed, but I can???t understand why he confessed. If he hypnotized a judge, it seems like he would uh, indicate to the judge not to ever relinquish any Information or, you know [FW: Yeah]. I-, and he said that, well maybe it was uh, because they were gonna have another hypnotist come in and hypnotize him, but you can???t hypnotize anyone against their will, you know.

FW: Yeah, it???s true. That???s incredible, though. Eh, d-, did he like do it right in the courtroom?

Inf: Yeah. And they said that a-, if you can use hypnosis, you can do a lot of things. He said, I think it was in Spain, uh, this guy hypnotized these kids to uh, make all A???s on their grades, and they did it.

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